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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Charles Dickens Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 1043 pictures in our Charles Dickens collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Humour social comment the ale house cartoon by Cruikshank Featured Charles Dickens Print

Humour social comment the ale house cartoon by Cruikshank

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated 1832. The Ale House is one of two panels that belong side-by-side, and this is number 1 of 2. Its companion is called The Home. (1832 is actually in the reign of Queen Victoria's predecessor, William IV.) Amongst other things, Cruikshank provided book illustrations for Charles Dickens. (Title) The Ale House. Most of the men are smoking pipes, and a smoky fug pervades the sketch. On the table is a jug of ale and a variety of drinking vessels, no two the same. On the wall are pictures of cock fighting and dog fighting, two activities that now are frowned upon (although even today, in the USA, it is reported that there are around 40, 000 people professionally involved in such sport'). Overall, there is a bright atmosphere of drunken revelry, to contrast with the grim darkness of the companion sketch The Home. Designed Etched & Published byGeorge Cruikshank. Septr. 1st 1832

© Whiteway

Captain Collins of Brighton, with his family Featured Charles Dickens Print

Captain Collins of Brighton, with his family

Captain Fred Collins of Brighton, who ran three pleasure boats called the Skylark and was a familiar figure on Brighton Beach for sixty years. His cry of Any More for the Skylark became so famous that it became a national saying for pleasure boats. It is believed that the novelist Charles Dickens knew Collins, and went for a trip on the Skylark in 1867, commenting later on the captain's witty chatter to the trippers. Collins is seen here on the right, with his son, grandson and great grandson. The fleet continued to sail until just after the Second World War under his son, also named Fred Collins, although two of the three boats were lost at Dunkirk in 1940

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10410849

Humour smuggler punches preventive man 19th century cartoon Featured Charles Dickens Print

Humour smuggler punches preventive man 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: Black Eyed Sue the bold smuggler ? and Will Watch the look out man Speech bubble: I should like to catch you overhauling my pockets indeed!! ? You calls yourself a preventive man don't you Mr. Dummy? Now I'll lay you a crown that you can't prevent me from giving you a good dab of the chops. Description: Cruikshank makes a play on the term preventive man'. The preventive men were watchers on the shore who looked to intercept smugglers. An on-line reference says the era of the preventive men began in 1831, but this joke pre-dates that by a couple of years. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank ? Novr. 1st 1829 More cartoons by George Cruikshank

© Whiteway