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Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 8381 pictures in our Magazines collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Queen Elizabeth II by Pietro Annigoni in the ILN Featured Magazines Print

Queen Elizabeth II by Pietro Annigoni in the ILN

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of the United Kingdom and Head of the Commonwealth (born 1926), by Pietro Annigoni 1953.
Pietro Annigoni (7 June 1910 to 28 October 1988) was an Italian portrait and fresco painter, who became world famous after painting Queen Elizabeth II in 1956.
His work bore the influence of Italian Renaissance portraiture, and was in contrast to the modernist and post-modernist artistic styles that dominated the middle and late twentieth century. He was known for his romantic portrayal of the young Queen Elizabeth II in 1956, as well as for his portraits of Pope John XXIII, US Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, the Shah and Empress of Iran, Princess Margaret and several other members of the British royal family.
Pietro Annigoni was chosen by TIME magazine to paint President of the United States John F. Kennedy for the (January 5) 1962 Person of the Year cover. The result was perhaps his worst portrait as Kennedy would not sit still and Annigoni had no time or inclination to satisfy Time magazine. Other TIME magazine covers that featured portraits by Annigoni were the issues of October 5, 1962 (Pope John XXIII), November 1, 1963 (Ludwig Erhard), and April 12, 1968 (Lyndon B. Johnson).
Other subjects around the world that Annigoni painted include HRH Prince Phillip and several other members of the House of Windsor as well as the shoemaker Salvatore Ferragamo, Florentine author Luigi Ugolini, ballet legend Dame Margot Fonteyn, British actress Julie Andrews, Russian ballet star Rudolf Nureyev, American actress and poet Vanna Bonta as a girl, and the Maharani Gayatri Devi of Jaipur. An outspoken artist who did not refrain from iconoclasm toward his perception of passing or superficial social trends, Annigoni wrote essays challenging modern art that disregarded the basic ability to draw. He alienated critics, who claimed his art was too representational, discounting the unique dramatic signature the artist brought to Renaissance tradition

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10511403

Cornish tin mines, 19th century Featured Magazines Print

Cornish tin mines, 19th century

Cornish tin mines, 19th-century artwork. These mines are in the parish of St Just in Penwith, Cornwall, UK. 19th-century tin mines in this area date back to 1721. The workings extended out under the sea for nearly a kilometre, and some of the tunnels were only a few metres below the seabed. The mines employed hundreds of men and reached a depth of 400 metres. Thousands of tons of tin and copper were produced, but most of the mines had closed by the early 20th century. Artwork from the 13th volume (first period of 1894) of the French popular science weekly 'La Science Illustree'

© SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Our ?Little Contemptibles?, 1914 Featured Magazines Print

Our ?Little Contemptibles?, 1914

Our ?Little Contemptibles?, 1914.Oil on canvas by William Barns Wollen (1857-1936), 1918 (c); exhibited at the Royal Academy 1918 (No 260).Composed of regular soldiers and reservists, the British Expeditionary Force landed on the Continent in August in 1914. During the early months of World War One (1914-1918) it was engaged in slowing down the German advance. This painting depicts open warfare with British infantry wearing large packs, taking cover behind a hedge; German artillery in the distance. The British Army?s experiences in the Boer War (1899-1902) had resulted in major reforms in organization, administration, tactics, weapons and equipment. Introduced in 1906, the Short Magazine Lee-Enfield rifle, shown in this painting, enabled troops to produce very rapid, accurate fire. Infantry training now placed more emphasis on the ability to shoot straight and fast, and on mobility. These professional soldiers, drilled in new methods of attack, defence, and withdrawal, were taught to take greater advantage of cover.The title of the canvas relates to an order given by Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany (1859 -1941) to the commander of his First Army, Alexander von Kluck (1846-1934), in August, 1914:- ?It is my Royal and Imperial Command that you concentrate your energies? and all the valour of my soldiers to exterminate first the treacherous English; walk over General French's insignificant [or contemptible] little Army. In fact the German advance was checked, and the men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces who survived these heavy engagements proudly adopted the ironic title, ?The Old Contemptibles?. These men who served between the outbreak of war and midnight on 22 November 1914 were awarded the 1914 Star.In the 1880s, the artist, William Barns Wollen, served in the 20th (Artists?) Volunteer Battalion, The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort?s Own), popularly known as the Artists? Rifles. Date: 1914

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library