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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Poisonous Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 805 pictures in our Poisonous collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Poisonous and Toxic Plants, Victorian Botanical Illustration Featured Print

Poisonous and Toxic Plants, Victorian Botanical Illustration

Very Rare, Beautifully Illustrated Antique Engraved Victorian Botanical Illustration of Wildflowers, Poisonous and Toxic Plants: Plate 24, from The Book of Practical Botany in Word and Image (Lehrbuch der praktischen Pflanzenkunde in Wort und Bild), Published in 1886. Copyright has expired on this artwork. Digitally restored.

© Craig McCausland

Madagascan mantella (Mantella madagascariensis) Featured Print

Madagascan mantella (Mantella madagascariensis)

Madagascan mantella (Mantella madagascariensis) a colourful rainforest inhabitant that retains toxins in its skin from the insects it eats. It is threatened by loss of habitat. Madagascar

© Joe McDonald/AUSCAPE All rights reserved

Amphibia, Amphibian, Animal, Animals, Anura, Anuran, Captive, Colourful, Controlled Situation, Diurnal, Endangered, Endemic To Madagascar, Fauna, Frog, Ground Dwelling, In Captivity, Madagascar, Madagascar Golden Frog, Malagasy Painted Mantella, Mantella, Mantellas, Mantellidae, Multicoloured, Pets, Poisonous, Rainforest Wildlife, Side View, Skin, Species, Terrestrial, Toxic, Toxins, Vibrant Colours, Vulnerable, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade

Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic Featured Print

Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic

Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic. William Morris, famed for his wallpaper designs, was the son of the owner of the largest arsenic producing company in the country. He was sceptical that arsenic was bad for you and held that because he had arsenical wallpaper in his home (and wasn't sick) it had to be something else! Morris did however stop using arsenic in their papers as the result of public pressure, newspaper reports and a general idea that arsenic was toxic, not just when ingested. Date: 19th century

© Mary Evans / The National Archives, London. England.