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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Species Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 710 pictures in our Species collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Sailing of a Humpback Whale and Display of its Tail in Juneau, Alaska, United States of America Featured Print

The Sailing of a Humpback Whale and Display of its Tail in Juneau, Alaska, United States of America

The humpback whale is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12-16 m (39-52 ft) and weigh about 36, 000 kg (79, 000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is known for breaching and other distinctive surface behaviors, making it popular with whale watchers.

© :: Artie | Photography ::

Charles Darwin in his evolutionary tree Featured Print

Charles Darwin in his evolutionary tree

Charles Darwin in his evolutionary tree. Caricature of the British naturalist Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882) sitting in his 'evolutionary tree'. Darwin studied the differences in closely related but geographically separated species. The evolutionary tree was the notion that all living things are related and, as different species have evolved from common ancestors, new 'branches' of the tree occur. This notion was first illustrated and popularised in The Origin of Species (1859), which also discussed 'natural selection', the notion that variations in species form arose over time, but only those variations which enhanced a species' chance of survival would be propagated.

© BILL SANDERSON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Galapagos finches, artwork Featured Print

Galapagos finches, artwork

Galapagos finches. Artwork showing the beaks of different species of finches found in the Galapagos Islands. These birds were so different that naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) first thought that they were unrelated to each other. However, he later realised that they were all finches, in what is now known as the family Fringillidae. He went on to draw the conclusion that they all probably came from a common ancestor, but had diversified and evolved to adapt to local food supplies on the different islands, hence the specialised beak shapes seen here. See C003/5865 for a labelled version of this image.

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY